OUTCOME OF EVERY WOMAN HOPE CENTRE WEBINAR FOR COMMITMENTS TO THE SHARM EL-SHEIK TO KUNMING ACTION AGENDA FOR NATURE AND PEOPLE

BY EDEL-QUINN IJEOMA AGBAEGBU

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Every Woman Hope Centre is a Nigeria registered non-governmental organization (NGO), and a Biosafety Organization / BCH-ORG-SCBD-251066-1: with strength in advocacy for biodiversity sustainability. EWHC is promoting commitments in Africa to the Sharm El-Sheik, Egypt; to Kunming, China, Action Agenda for Nature and People, towards reversing biodiversity loss and promoting positive gains to 2030. This was harnessed through a whole-of-society approach, for the transformative changes needed to achieve the 2050 Vision of Living in Harmony with Nature.  

EWHC made the  first biosafety commitment on the Action Agenda promoting the implementation of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity to ensure safe handling, transfer and use of living modified organisms  to help in raising awareness on the urgent need to halt the loss of biodiversity and restore healthy ecosystems. The commitment is part of the positive actions for the Action Agenda, to set the stage for an ambitious global biodiversity framework, to be adopted in Kunming, China, in 2021.

The EWHC commitment, as the first and only global biosafety commitment out of 156, as at December, 16, 2020, is a mark of history of excellence and a pride to Africa, especially Nigeria. It was motivated by the SCBD’s call, to make a commitment to the Sharm El-Sheik to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People; and to advance biosafety and biodiversity agenda. It is available at: https://www.cbd.int/action-agenda/contributions/action/?action-id=5f486c36b704c80001b000db.

In the commitment, EWHC pledged to mobilize strategic plans and actions, for public awareness of biosafety and biodiversity issues, as well as disseminate adequate information on implementation strategies to facilitate awareness-raising activities. A major significant factor in EWHC’s action in the commitment is that by 2025 at the latest, all stakeholders, including students and educators are aware of the values of biosafety and biodiversity.

As part of this commitment, the EWHC organized a Webinar on December 8, 2020, with the topic; UNEP Programme: Sharm El-Sheikh to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People Webinar, and theme; “MOTIVATING STRATEGIC PLANS AND ACTIONS FOR PUBLIC AWARENESS ON BIOSAFETY AND BIODIVERSITY, TO ENHANCE PARTNERSHIP WITH NATURE”. The Webinar fostered communication to ensure that by 2025, people are aware of the meaning and values of biosafety and biodiversity, as well as steps they can take to use them for sustainable development.It promoted and showcased a groundswell of actions from both state and non-state actors, to safeguard and reverse biodiversity loss, provided momentum towards the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework to be adopted at the fifteenth meeting of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity in China.

The Webinar, a three-hour session was conducted in English. It was an integrated policy and institutional review process; and provided an overview of the policy and institutional contexts that concerns the global biodiversity framework and the implementation plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. This was to ensure the sustainable use of our biodiversity and environmental sustainability, in line with the provisions of the SDGs. It was also an engagement platform, which mobilized strategic plans and actions through discussions and feedbacks. It received a wide participation of stake holders from various sectors and backgrounds across the globe, especially in Africa. They all discussed the implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, to regional and national framework and actions that would ensure a more sustainable and equitable management, protection and restoration of biodiversity and ecosystems.

The webinar was a great event and demonstrated the commitment of EWHC, to raise ambition for the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. It supported strategic plans for the post-2020 process, as well as positive actions to promote the implementation, while contributing also to the sustainability of the SDGs. It underscored the urgency of action on the post-2020 global biodiversity framework and made recommendations on how the biosafety commitment can be translated into action.

There were five presentations during the Webinar from different Speakers, who contributed tremendously in advancing the EWHC Biosafety Commitment, for greater support for the Kunming Action Agenda. The sixth presentation came from the Nigeria’s Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development (FMARD) after the Webinar. These presentations, being part of the output from the Webinar discussions, provided key messages and take-aways for greater impact and awareness of methodologies to track progress in the implementation of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework.

There was also a presentation by Ms. Ulrika Nilsson, of a video launch on public education regarding LMOs, which is available at: http://bch.cbd.int/protocol/education.shtml. Ms. Nilsson noted that the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol that is expected to be adopted at COP-MOP 10 in 2021 has a goal related to education regarding LMOs. In this regard, the video is intending to build capacity to government officials, academic institutions and other stakeholders of the importance of biosafety education and setting up systems to establish biosafety education. It can also be used to non-state actors to make commitments on education, regarding LMOs in the Action Agenda at:https://www.cbd.int/action-agenda/ ( [1] The national communication plan template is available at http://bch.cbd.int/onlineconferences/portal_art23/resources.shtml )

AN OVERVIEW OF KEY DISCUSSIONS

The Webinar presentations were widely circulated online at: https://everywomanhopecentre.org/webinar/ and generated public awareness on biosafety and biodiversity issues. Adequate information were disseminated on implementation strategies, to facilitate awareness-raising activities, on the urgent need to halt the loss of biodiversity and restore healthy ecosystems for improved livelihood and secured food systems. The presentations were the major output of the event. They addressed the causes of biodiversity loss and mainstreamed effective implementation actions on biosafety and biodiversity sensitization, across all sectors of government, society and economy. They identified implementation priorities that are capable of supporting the Action Agenda; and proffered initiatives and commitments to deliver the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework for the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development and the SDGs.

MEASURABLE OUTPUT

  • FACILITATING AWARENESS RAISING ACTIVITIES ON BIOSAFETY AND BIODIVERSITY ISSUES FOR GOVERNMENT AND OTHER STAKE HOLDERS FOR INFORMED DECISIONS AND POLICIES ON NATURE AND MAN – MOHAMMED SABO NANONO, HON. MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT, NIGERIA
  • FOSTERING BIOSAFETY COMMITMENT: THE GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY FRAMEWORK AND THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR THE CARTAGENA PROTOCOL ON BIOSAFETY TO REGIONAL AND NATIONAL FRAMEWORKS AND ACTIONS TO ENSURE SUSTAINABLE USE OF OUR BIODIVERSITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITYMS. WADZANAYI MANDIVENYI, HEAD BIOSAFETY UNIT OF THE SECRETARIAT OF THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY
  • FOSTERING BIOSAFETY COMMITMENTS AS A STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK / TOOL TO ENSURE SUSTAINABLE USE OF OUR BIODIVERSITY – W. MATHURIN ROUAMBA – POINT FOCAL BCH, BURKINA FASO
  • THE NEED TO DISSEMINATE ADEQUATE INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE ON BIOSAFETY AND BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION, AND IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES INTO THE SCHOOL SYSTEMS – JICENTA NCHANGNWIE FONCHA (Ph.D), CAMEROON – HEAD OF DEPARTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES, PAN AFRICAN INSTITUTE FOR DEVELOPMENT, WEST AFRICA (PAIDWA), DIPLOMATIC INSTITUTION, BUEA S.W.R. CAMEROON, PROGRAMME COORDINATOR FOR ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
  • THE RISE OF AFRICA BIOSAFETY COMMITMENT IN THE “SHARMMEL-SHEIK TO KUNMING ACTION AGENDA”: THE RELEVANCE AND IMPACTON ECOSYSTEM AND LIVELIHOOD – RUFUS EBEGBA (Ph.D), DIRECTOR-GENERAL/CEO, NATIONAL BIOSAFETY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, NIGERIA
  • THE SIGNIFICANCE OF PUBLIC AWARENESS ON BIOSAFETY AND THE URGENT NEED TO HALT THE LOSS OF BIODIVERSITY AND RESTORE HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMSBy EDEL-QUINN IJEOMA AGBAEGBU, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EVERY WOMAN HOPE CENTRE
  • THE LAUNCH OF A VIDEO ON EDUCATION REGARDING LMOs TO BUILD CAPACITY TO SET IN PLACE EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES ON LMOs

KEY MESSAGES

  • The Sharm El-Sheik to Kunming Action Agenda for Nature and People is a global platform to showcase actions from non-state actors, in support of nature and in line with the Global Biodiversity Framework and Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety.  It is also an engagement platform, to raise awareness on the urgent need to halt the loss of biodiversity and restore healthy ecosystems; and aims towards reversing biodiversity loss and promoting positive gains to 2030.
  • The Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety sets the international standards for ensuring the sustainable development of biotechnology and protection of biodiversity and human health.
  • Safe modern and emerging biotechnology, ensured through biosafety, has contributed and is still contributing in conservation and sustenance of biodiversity as well as dealing with potential risks.
  • Every Woman Hope Centre (EWHC)’s biosafety commitment shall mainly mobilize strategic plans and actions, for public awareness purposes on biosafety and biodiversity, as well as develop and facilitate awareness-raising activities to disseminate adequate information on implementation strategies for biodiversity conservation and promote healthy environment for improved livelihood and food systems.
  • EWHC shall foster communication to ensure that by 2025, people are aware of the meaning and values of biosafety and biodiversity, as well as the steps they can take to use it more sustainably for ecosystem sustainability and health.
  • African Union Development Agency – the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (AUDA-NEPAD), at COP 14, leading the African delegates, had a strong common position on the need for increased commitment in Biosafety in Africa.
  • Fostering biosafety commitments are very Strategic and Strengthens the Global Biodiversity Framework and Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, to regional and national frameworks and actions, to ensure sustainable use of our biodiversity and environmental sustainability.
  • Biodiversity is very essential for the ecosystem’s health, sustainable food production and resilient livelihood.
  • The impact of the growing global population basically, is affecting these very natural resources on which human life is based.
  • There is every need for aggressive communication in bringing biosafety in the forefront of biodiversity. To protect our biodiversity and human health from potential adverse impact of modern biotechnology brought the knowledge of Biosafety to the forefront of world’s attention and focus, for effective living in harmony with nature in 2050.
  • The importance of biodiversity resources has only been recently recognized in many nations of the world, especially in Africa, as much emphasis has been placed in the past on infrastructure, economic and social development, with minimal attention on the conservation of natural resource.
  • Lack of awareness on the importance of biodiversity is common, with the biodiversity often perceived as a resource to be extracted and exploited through various unsustainable manners. We degrade this nature’s gift to humanity, as well as breaching many planetary boundaries through our own actions; and the biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate
  • Now, as never before, the overall target is to significantly reduce biodiversity loss, while maintaining various types of ecosystems, species and gene pools; as well as to sustainably protect all components of biodiversity. This is due to the fact that the alarming pace of biodiversity loss / erosion, which implies the reduction and disappearance of species and genetic diversity and degradation of the ecosystem, threatens devastating consequences for mankind if it goes unchecked.
  • According to reports, released in 2018 by Inter-governmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, (IPBES), habitat change, climate change, invasive species, over-exploitation of natural resources and pollution are the direct drivers of biodiversity loss / erosion.
  • Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate change and variability, with negative impacts on the ecosystems and human health, including food and water security.
  • Unfortunately, while changes to the climate may be reversible with time, there is no going back once species become extinct; thereby putting nature’s vital contribution to humanity in jeopardy, endangering economies, food security, cultural diversity and livelihoods, while constituting a major threat to peace and security. Safeguarding biodiversity on earth is therefore very critical, in overcoming major global challenges
  • Indeed, Biodiversity loss is a reality; and needs to be tackled very urgently.
  • We have the responsibility to work collectively, constructively and effectively, for the common good of our planet and welfare of its people in line with the targets of the Action Agenda.
  • Policy Makers and stakeholders have to adopt a new model for a more effective gender and youth participation in biosafety and biodiversity issues, towards actualizing the aims, targets and visions; as the roles of the indigenous people and local communities are very relevant in realizing the biosafety commitment.
  • Global conservation of biodiversity will not be achieved without the sustainable management of areas in which people and nature interact.
  • By conserving our biodiversity and ecosystems, we are retaining                                            the capacity of the planet to sustain our prosperity. This is the time; and we have all it takes to reconcile people with nature; and restore the biodiversity.

ACTION, IMPACT AND FEEDBACK

  • Out of the several actions in the 151 commitments as at November 2020, there were only 31 actions in relation to Africa and only 1 Biosafety related action, initiated by Every Woman Hope Centre, (EWHC), a Nigeria Registered Non-Governmental-Organization (NGO); making EWHC a very relevant tool for the rise of Africa biosafety and a model of excellence in biosafety.
  • The Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on biosafety is in line with Nigeria’s vision and mission and the EWHC’s biosafety commitment.
  • Nigeria’s Position for CPB Post-2020 process through its vision and mission, is in line with the EWHC’s Africa Biosafety Commitment.
  • There are more concerns now, for the incorporation of the biosafety commitment into National Biosafety Systems in the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on biosafety and to raise ambition for the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework.
  • The EWHC biosafety commitment in the Action Agenda created a general platform which mobilized interactions and actions to raise more biosafety commitments.
  • EWHC biosafety commitment is setting the stage for ‘‘COP15 but also the tenth Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (CP / MOP 10) and the fourth Conference of Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Nagoya Protocol (COP / MOP 4), in China, where about 196 countries are expected to discuss and adopt the Global Biodiversity Framework and the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety.
  • EWHC joined a global movement of people, committed to finding ways and means to accelerate progress in biodiversity goals and deliverables, in recognition of the ecosystem services in contributing to the wellbeing of the planet and the need to reconnect communities with nature, for an inspiring future.
  • EWHC, as a model of excellence in biosafety communication, led Delegates of Nations on in the Webinar, to discuss common goals towards the conservation of biological diversity and decided the way forward to reverse biodiversity loss.
  • Through the Webinar, EWHC communicated relevant information and knowledge on biosafety and biodiversity conservation and sustainable use to various nations of the world, to ensure they sustain the momentum of the Action Agenda.
  • The session established the need to disseminate adequate information and knowledge required to conserve biodiversity.
  • There has been significant awareness-raising of the Kunming Action Agenda globally, especially in Nigeria, based on EWHC successful collaboration with relevant Ministry, Department and Agency (MDAs) in Nigeria, in fostering the Action Agenda and the Cartagena Protocol. Further discussions are still ongoing with other relevant MDAs for similar partnership.

THE KEY TASK

  • To take urgent action across societies, to rebuild our human-nature relationship and put biodiversity on a path to recovery for the benefit of planet and people.
  • To promote aggressive advocacy for the global need to present biosafety as key in sustainable ecosystem and livelihood. This also entails aggressively raising the issues of biosafety system in media during the Conference of Parties on Convention on Biological Diversity, towards a more effective communication.
  • To further amplify and mainstream public awareness and appreciation of the diverse values of biodiversity needs, within the global biodiversity framework, to facilitate and ensure the transformation of human behaviour and choice in favour of biodiversity conservation and restoration, for its sustainable use and inspire further actions.
  • To utilize the accelerated focus on the Aichi Biodiversity Targets, to design a Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, in a transformative way. This is to galvanize urgent and transformative action by Governments and all of society, for the Implementation of the vision of living in harmony with nature by 2050, promotion of public understanding and stewardship; and the implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety.
  • Engage more non-state actors (e.g., NGOs, such as Every Woman Hope Centre (EWHC), private sectors, women) in the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the biosafety target in the Global Biosafety Framework and the SDGs.
  • Shared values are best ways to build public trust. Therefore, there is urgent need to entrench expanded knowledge on biosafety, for biodiversity and environmental sustainability, as well as innovations in conservation.
  • Develop and establish biodiversity systems and institutions, to promote and coordinate biodiversity actions and trajectories, required to mainstream and integrate biodiversity in all relevant economic sectors and national policies.  

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • It was proposed that there should be a significant movement towards environmental literacy on biosafety and biodiversity issues. These should be properly integrated into school curricula and aims towards improving on the mechanisms for biosafety and biodiversity education, especially for women and youth, indigenous peoples and local communities to harness both human resources and technical capacities; and enhance their involvement in information and knowledge dissemination.
  • There exists poor data infrastructure on biodiversity, as well as lack of sufficient capacity and guidelines on how to address specific pathways in dealing with ecosystems degradation. The need to conduct a biosafety and biodiversity survey; and carry out research studies, to identify habitats of high biodiversity and ecosystem services, including impact and feedbacks on values and priorities for ecosystem restoration and conservation was recommended.
  • As a methodology to track progress in biodiversity conservation to support the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, it was also included in the recommendations, to undertake pilot projects to build capacity of developing country parties in mainstreaming the Global Biodiversity Framework into National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans, (NBSAPs).
  • Studies also have to note and safeguard the wildlife corridors, as part of the spatial development / habitat connectivity axes / Green Infrastructure.
  • There is also urgent need for capacity building on innovative best practices and strengthen capacities in developing methodologies to provide constructive guidelines and pathways to support actions and promote implementation.
  • To improve production efficiency, whilst promoting conservation of biodiversity habitats and restoration of degraded areas, strategic actions should be directed towards the development and production of an ATLAS, which should document the wealth of the world’s species of plants, and animals involving museums, zoos, aquaria, botanic gardens, universities and biodiversity research institutions for referencing.
  • It was also submitted that there is an urgent need for research studies and inventories to determine amongst others, how local people manage their biological resources; and how changes in resource availability and land use affects behavior. This aims towards facilitating the development of accurate and adequate information pack for informed decisions and effective actions on biosafety and biodiversity restoration and conservation.
  • Governance options that harness synergies was also recommended to enhance capacity to build synergy across Parties and Regions to achieve the SDGs. Joint work on biosafety and collaborations of non-state actors with government and the private sectors including; financial institutions, multi-nationals and other stakeholders can generate political support and assistance for biosafety, for conservation and sustainable development of biodiversity.
  • There is also a need to build credibility and transparency in African Biosafety System, to cooperate with other States and international bodies to promote public awareness and education.
  • Parties should review and strengthen their national forest policies, as well as strengthening and implementing the provisions of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). They should demonstrate capacity to reverse key sectoral practices, policies and policy-factor drivers that lead to biodiversity loss. They should equally establish and implement a national procedure for Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES), to enhance private sector investment and corporate social support to biodiversity protection.
  • States and non-state actors including other relevant stakeholders should set up biosafety-action-models; that can facilitate biodiversity conservation towards a healthy ecosystem and develop new mechanisms for ex-situ conservation.
  • The impact of the role of gender and youth in addressing strategic plans and actions, for public awareness purposes on biosafety or biodiversity awareness-building should not be neglected. There should be increased effort to advance gender in the efforts towards sustainable environment.
  • There were recommendations also, to design and develop activities and programs, such as trainings and competitions; to foster effective communication and awareness on the implementation of the agenda.
  • We cannot rest as the threat to biodiversity continues. Therefore, we should mobilize strategic plans and actions, for public awareness of biosafety and biodiversity issues, as well as disseminate adequate information on implementation strategies to raise ambition for the post-2020 global biodiversity framework in furtherance of the biosafety commitment.

SUGESTED STRATEGIES

  • effective communication for adequate knowledge on biosafety and biodiversity and to significantly achieve global commitments and effective implementation.
  • The development of the educational components of biosafety and biodiversity conservation strategy, as part of a broader national educational program, should not be undertaken in isolation. Rather, it should be inclusive to integrate scientific and traditional knowledge. This strategy is relevant, as there can be no effective conservation programs without involving the local communities and the integration of their indigenous or traditional knowledge of conservation.
  • To galvanize urgent and transformative action by governments and all of society and engage more non-state actors in the Implementation Plan for the Protocol.
  • Outreach and awareness campaigns shall be conducted, in collaboration with the media, for adequate information and to motivate public discussions on biodiversity and its significance to ecology, economy, life and services, with specific emphasis on indigenous and local communities, while promoting environmental social media networking among the youths.
  • Conservation messages shall be crafted from valuable information sets generated through research studies and records; and conveyed to targeted stakeholders. The aim is to enable a deeper understanding of the values of biosafety and biodiversity; and inspire correct and effective action by governments and other stakeholders at all levels.
  • The celebration of International Day for Biodiversity, 22 May, should be elaborate and inclusive of hosting the annual national biodiversity dialogues, press conferences and awards; to serve as an overarching communication system and reward of excellence.

CONCLUSION

The prevalent challenges of environmental degradation have resulted in colossal losses that threaten the productivity and sustainability of the world’s land and water resources. Nigeria, for instance, has the highest deforestation rate of primary forest in Africa, with annual losses estimated at 11.1 percent between 2000 to 2008 (FAO, 2005). It is quite obvious that environmental degradation problems are intertwined with the risk and vulnerability associated with climate change; which affects all sectors, including socio-economic development; and leads to loss of biodiversity, conflicts in natural resource use, as well as migration, among others.

Maintaining the biodiversity is one of the main environmental challenges our planet has to face at the beginning of the 21st century. The major challenge still remains that the 2020 deadline, for achieving the Aichi Biodiversity Target and the Strategic Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the Strategic Plan for the Convention on Biological Diversity has ended. Yet, a great deal needs to be done for the Implementation Plan for the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety and the biosafety target in the Global Biodiversity Framework and the SDGs.

The time has come to accelerate the achievement of these targets. Stakeholders should have a critical thinking and develop road maps to recovery strategies. This should serve as tools to convey new concepts in conservation strategies to meet the changing conservation needs. Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) for instance, has been identified to address most of the identified land degradation problems, including loss of biodiversity. This approach involves multiple transformative transitions; and integrates a complex set of objectives, for which there are newly identified knowledge gaps. It equally projects the need to build evidence and design trajectories. Different authorities therefore, should draw up different safeguards and strategic action plans, to be instituted to disseminate information for improved knowledge.

The vision Living in Harmony with Nature by 2050 must be realized through actionable and achievable framework. Conservation and sustainable development actions must be constructively integrated and mainstreamed in all agenda to demonstrate that nature is all of us. We are indebted to our future generations and we need to act collectively and most effectively now for the common good of our planet and welfare of its people. We have made significant impact in reversing biodiversity loss and should not relent on our commitment and all positive actions for the implementation of the action agenda for nature and people.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 

Every Woman Hope Centre (EWHC), acknowledgement and heartfelt thanks are due to the Secretariate of Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), for providing the technical support, through Ms. Ulrika Nilsson; Associate Public Information Officer, Biosafety Unit, SCBD Action Agenda. We are grateful for her commitment and efforts in communicating all relevant information, regarding this program, to all stakeholders, through the SCBD’s social media handles. Thank you, Ulrika, for your support and dedication towards a successful Webinar. We also thank the Secretariat’s ICT Unit, for their services and communication of EWHC’s relevant messages through flyers and designs. We sincerely appreciate these gestures and privilege.

EWHC also appreciates the Speakers at the Webinar; for their efforts in addressing relevant issues towards fostering EWHC’s Biosafety Commitment for the Action Agenda and promoting positive gains to 2030.  We thank them for using the platform provided by EWHC, to demonstrate their ambition to inform and raise awareness, on the urgency of actions to reduce the drivers of biodiversity loss; and shift towards nature-positive-outcome, for a sustainable future.

EWHC also wishes to acknowledge the immense contributions of a number of other people, too numerous to mention, including the staff of EWHC and their family members, as well as staff of the Nigerian Biosafety Management Agency, (NBMA), who, as partners to the EWHC Biosafety Commitment for the Action Agenda, provided the Venue for the Webinar at NBMA head office in Abuja; and a Coordinating-Team, who worked together with the EWHC Webinar-Team, for the success of the event.

EWHC hereby expresses gratitude, to all participants from all sectors and backgrounds across the world, who joined the Webinar through Zoom; for their effective contributions to build-back better and take the actions needed for building a shared future for all life on earth, as one global community. Indeed, we made it happen; motivating, mobilizing and connecting new voices, in support of the biodiversity agenda, which provides a mandate to address biodiversity considerations. Together we emphasized the importance of compelling knowledge, increased awareness and building capacities to identify the impact of conservation and sustainable use of policies and frameworks in achieving relevant targets, as well as accelerating progress in the implementation of the Global Biodiversity Framework, (GBF), and Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs.

EDEL-QUINN IJEOMA AGBAEGBU IS THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EVERY WOMAN HOPE CENTRE (EWHC)


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